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Tips And Tricks On How To Train Your Dog Correctly

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: De Havilland Canada DHC-1A Chipmunk Pennzoil Special
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Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | De Havilland-Canada DHC-1A Chipmunk, Pennzoil Special

De Havilland originally designed the Chipmunk after World War II as a primary trainer to replace the venerable Tiger Moth. Among the tens of thousands of pilots who trained in or flew the Chipmunk for pleasure was veteran aerobatic and movie pilot Art Scholl. He flew his Pennzoil Special at air shows throughout the 1970s and early ’80s, thrilling audiences with his skill and showmanship and proving that the design was a top-notch aerobatic aircraft.

Art Scholl purchased the DHC-1A in 1968. He modified it to a single-seat airplane with a shorter wingspan and larger vertical fin and rudder, and made other changes to improve its performance. Scholl was a three-time member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team, an air racer, and a movie and television stunt pilot. At air shows, he often flew with his dog Aileron on his shoulder or taxied with him standing on the wing.

Gift of the Estate of Arthur E. Scholl

Manufacturer:
De Havilland Canada Ltd.

Pilot:
Art Scholl

Date:
1946

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 9.4 m (31 ft)
Length: 7.9 m (26 ft)
Height: 2.1 m (7 ft 1 in)
Weight, empty: 717 kg (1,583 lb)
Weight, gross: 906 kg (2,000 lb)
Top speed: 265 km/h (165 mph)
Engine: Lycoming GO-435, 260 hp

Materials:
Overall: Aluminum Monocoque

Physical Description:
Single-engine monoplane. Lycoming GO-435, 260 hp engine.

Long Description:
The de Havilland Chipmunk was originally designed as a post World War II primary trainer, a replacement for the venerable de Havilland Tiger Moth training biplane used by the air forces of the British Commonwealth throughout World War II. Among the tens of thousands of pilots who trained in or flew the Chipmunk for pleasure was veteran aerobatic and movie pilot Art Scholl. He flew his Pennzoil Special at airshows around the country throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, thrilling audiences with skill and showmanship, and proving that the design itself was a top-notch aerobatic aircraft.

The Chipmunk was designed, initially built and flown by de Havilland Canada subsidiary, hence the very Canadian "woods country" sounding name of Chipmunk that complemented their other aircraft the Beaver, Otter, and Caribou. The prototype first flew on May 22, 1946 in Toronto. DeHavilland of Canada produced 158 Chipmunks and de Havilland in England produced 740 airplanes for training at various Royal Air Force and University Air Squadrons during the late 1940s and into the 1950s. In 1952, His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh took his initial flight training in a Chipmunk. It was also used in other roles, such as light communications flights in Germany and for internal security duties on the island of Cyprus.

The Chipmunk was an all-metal, low wing, tandem two-place, single engine airplane with a conventional tail wheel landing gear. It had fabric-covered control surfaces and a clear plastic canopy covering the pilot and passenger/student positions. The production versions of the airplane were powered by a 145 hp in-line de Havilland Gipsy Major "8" engine.

Art Scholl purchased two Canadian-built Chipmunks from the surplus market after they became available in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He purchased the two-place DHC-1A, N114V, first and it now resides in the Experimental Aircraft Association’s museum in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. In 1968, Scholl bought another DHC-1A and began extensive modifications that resulted in almost a completely new aircraft. He covered over one cockpit to reconfigure the aircraft into a single-place aircraft and installed a (fuel injected) 260 hp Lycoming GO-435 flat-opposed 6-cylinder engine. He removed 20 inches from each wingtip and changed the airfoil section of the tip area. The reduction in span led to the need to lengthen the ailerons inboard to retain control effectiveness. This in turn reduced the flaps to where they became somewhat ineffective, and, since the flaps really were not required for the normal show and aerobatic routines, he removed them as a weight saving measure. These modifications improved the low speed tip stall characteristics and improved roll performance during aerobatic maneuvers.

The vertical fin and rudder acquired a 25% increase in area and an increased rudder throw to manage the effects of increased engine torque and for better directional control during slow-speed aerobatic routines. The standard fixed landing gear was replaced with a retractable gear from a Bellanca airplane. The landing gear was subsequently damaged during a belly landing and resulted in a permanent wheel toe-in that was never repaired. This caused a tire drag during takeoffs and landings that led to the need for tire replacement after about 10 takeoffs and landings. Other idiosyncrasies were the pitot static tube being fashioned from a golf club shaft and a 3-inch extension added to the cockpit control stick to ease the control loads during the more severe aerobatic routines. Scholl also installed rear-view mirrors on both sides of the cowling just forward of the windscreen. He placed an RAF placard on the instrument panel as a memorial to some Vulcan bomber crew members who were his personal friends. He installed three smoke generators with red, white, and blue smoke for his show routines that included the Lomcevak tumbling/tailslide maneuver.

Scholl designed most of these modifications himself, drawing upon his Ph.D. and his 18 years as a university professor in aeronautics. He held all pilot ratings, and was a licensed aircraft and powerplant (A&P) mechanic and an authorized FAA Inspector. He was also a three-time member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team, an air racer (placing several times at the National Air Races at Reno), an airshow pilot, and a fixed base operator with a school of international aerobatics. In 1959, Scholl began working for legendary Hollywood pilots Frank Tallman and Paul Mantz at Tallmantz Aviation and then later formed his own movie production company, producing and performing aerial photography and stunts for many movies and television shows. At airshows, Scholl often flew with his dog Aileron, who rode the wing as Scholl taxied on the runway or sat on his shoulder in the aircraft.

Art Scholl was killed in 1985 while filming in a Pitts Special for the movie Top Gun. Art Scholl’s estate donated the Pennzoil Special, N13Y, serial number 23, and his staff delivered it to the Garber Facility in Suitland, Maryland on August 18, 1987. It is currently on display at the Museum’s Stephen F. Udvar-Hazy Center at Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Virginia.

Hooray! What happens next? The right training will make both you and your dog happy. The suggestions here should be all you need to properly train your pet.

Keep your sessions short to accommodate a short attention span. Your dog will get bored and antsy if you spend too much time on one thing. Early on, your training sessions should be limited to less than 10 minutes.

Above all else, consistency is the key to effective dog training. Make a list of the commands that you are teaching your dog, and be sure that everyone in your household knows them. Be certain that everyone understands what constitutes good behavior and what constitutes bad behavior. Make sure that responses to these behaviors are uniform. When the people around the dog use different commands and responses, he may become confused and training could suffer.

Most dogs have anxiety as a reason for chewing. Confining him to a safe space like a dog crate and giving him a safe chew toy will allow him to stay busy working on a project while he awaits your return.

If you want your dog to follow the rules, keep training it, it needs to be refreshed! Many owners believe that once training is over, the dog will be set for life. Pets, just like humans, need to be reminded of the rules now and then. It is important that the training your dog receives is reinforced regularly.

If you are training your dog, it is best to use a variety of treats to reward your dog. Rewarding your dog with special treats during training will encourage him to obey the commands you give him. He will begin to look forward to your training sessions.

Playing tug-of-war with your puppy makes training less effective. Aggressive games promote aggressive behaviors, such as biting. Don’t let them get in the habit of doing so. When they are more well-trained, you can add these kinds of games into the mix.

Dogs can concentrate on one thing intensely and you will have to learn to break his attention. Once your dog knows his attention command, you will be able to coerce him to ignore almost anything.

Regular challenges will keep your dog from losing his chops. Make sure you quiz him on the stuff he knows, so he stays on his toes.

Any behavioral problems that crop up suddenly warrant a visit to your veterinarian to rule out health conditions. Some health conditions or pain can cause animals to lash out or act out of their element. This happens because they are unable to voice their pain to their owner and this may help the owner to identify that something is wrong.

When training a dog it is important to teach him good habits from the start. it is more difficult for your dog has to unlearn bad habits than it is to teach him good habits. If you do not want the dog to beg for table scraps, then never give it any food from the table to start with.

To train a dog to be well-behaved, be certain that all members of your family and all of your friends adhere to your instructions regarding training. Consistency is the best method for training a dog. If given mixed training, the animal will be baffled as to how to behave.

When training your dog, you should always make sure you use the same word or action for each individual behavior. This makes it easier for the dog to learn to associate the words with the actions you desire. Consistency is essential to training. Consistent commands will help make your training successful.

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Accidents are a part of training your puppy to go potty outside. Your training will go more smoothly if you always clean up accidents right away. The smell from a pet’s feces or urine can stay in the carpet. The puppy may return to that spot if it isn’t cleaned quickly. Many cleaning products are made just to eliminate this order, you can find them at any pet store.

Training a dog is beneficial for everyone. It makes the dog happy, the owner happy and the neighbors happy. Using the ideas presented here, you have what you need to start today with training your dog.

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